YnP Store     Your source for
nutritional supplements and more
Home Track Order My Cart About Us Contact Us
www.ynpstore.com  CN

End Fatigue Daily Energy Enfusion Citrus

End Fatigue Daily Energy Enfusion Citrus
(View larger picture)
End Fatigue Daily Energy Enfusion Citrus

Health Function: Anti-Fatigue, provides energy
Manufacturer: Integrative Therapeutics Inc.
Product Code: ITI73200-30X
Your Price: $50.00 ($40.00 after 20% off)

End Fatigue Daily Energy Enfusion features a combination of over 50 energy-building vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and amino acids for the support of optimal energy, healthy muscle function, and mental clarity.

  • Formulated with Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., the nation's leading energy expert and author of From Fatigued to Fantastic!
  • All-in-one drink mix contains over 50 vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and amino acids replaces the equivalent of over 30 tablets a day.
  • Stimulant-free all day energy
  • Most patients will notice up to a 76 percent improvement in the quality of life after three months of use
  • Felt a difference within 2-3 weeks

Ingredients

Calories 65
Calories from fat 5
Total Fat 0.5g <1%**
Cholesterol 10mg 3%**
Total Carbohydrate 10g 3%**
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%**
Protein 6g 12%**
Vitamin A (55% as beta carotene and as retinyl acetate) 4,500IU 90%
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 750mg 1,250%
Vitamin D (as cholecalciferol) 2,000IU 500%
Vitamin E (as d-alpha tocopheryl acetate) 100IU 333%
Vitamin K (as phytonadione) 100mcg 125%
Thiamin (as thiamin HCl) (vitamin B1) 75mg 5,000%
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 75mg 4,412%
Niacin (as niacinamide) 50mg 250%
Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine HCl) 85mg 4,250%
Folic Acid 800mcg 200%
Vitamin B12 (as cyanocobalamin) 500mcg 8,333%
Biotin 200mcg 67%
Pantothenic Acid (as calcium D-pantothenate) 50mg 500%
Calcium 100mg 10%
Iodine (as potassium iodide) 200mcg 133%
Magnesium (as magnesium glycinate) 200mg 50%
Zinc (as zinc gluconate) 15mg 100%
Selenium (as L-selenomethionine) 200mcg 286%
Copper (as copper gluconate) 500mcg 25%
Manganese (as manganese citrate) 2mg 100%
Chromium (as chromium picolinate) 200mcg 167%
Molybdenum (as sodium molybdate) 125mcg 167%
Sodium 20mg <1%
Potassium (from whey protein, potassium citrate, guar gum, and potassium iodide) 55mg 2%
Whey Protein (milk)** 7g *
Malic Acid 1.1g *
Betaine 750mg *
Inositol 750mg *
Inulin (from chicory root) 750mg *
Taurine** 500mg *
Glycine** 390mg *
L-Tyrosine** 377mg *
N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) 250mg *
L-Serine** 240mg *
Quercetin 125mg *
Alpha Lipoic Acid 100mg *
Choline Bitartrate 100mg *
Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) Leaf Extract 15:1 96mg *
Boron (as sodium borate) 2mg *
Strontium (as strontium chloride) 2mg

Who May Use

Patients who wishes to build an exceptional nutritional foundation, fight fatigue, and improve energy.

Suggested Usage

Each morning, take 1/2 to 1 scoop, or as recommended by your healthcare practitioner. For 1/2 scoop: Mix with 4-6 oz water, your favorite beverage, smoothie or yogurt. For 1 scoop: Mix with 8-12 oz. Drink within 30 minutes of preparation.

FUNCTIONS

Sufficient human energy levels are required for all physiologic functions, including muscle contractions, transportation of ions and molecules, and the synthesis of enzymes, hormones, and other macromolecules. Energy metabolism, the conversion of nutrients and oxygen into fuel, is a continuous process that takes place within the mitochondria, unique cellular structures. Mitochondrial energy production follows precise metabolic pathways and requires specific molecules, cofactors, and enzymes.2 The resulting product is the special carrier for cellular energy, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The energy released from ATP powers all physiologic functions.3

Any dysfunction along the complex and multi-stepped process of cellular energy metabolism may result in insufficient ATP production. Consequently, physiologic functions may be significantly affected. Muscle contractions may be weak, ions and molecules may not be transported effectively, and enzymatic reactions may be insufficient.2-4 The result is often fatigue, that state following a period of mental or bodily activity, characterized by a lessened capacity for work and reduced efficiency of accomplishment, usually accompanied by a feeling of occasional weariness, sleepiness, or irritability.5 Healthy human energy metabolism is crucial to sufficient ATP production.2-4

Adequate nutrition is, in turn, crucial to healthy human energy metabolism. Without the optimal daily intake of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, energy, in the form of ATP, cannot be produced. Even with adequate nutritional intake, energy demands often exceed energy stores, especially in the presence of emotional, spiritual, and physical stressors. Continued occasional imbalances in energy levels may result in disrupted healthy energy metabolism.2-4,6

Each individual ingredient in End FatigueTM Daily Energy EnfusionTM provides significant nutritional support for healthy energy metabolism.

While each individual ingredient in End Fatigue Daily Energy Enfusion provides significant nutritional support for healthy energy metabolism, it is theorized that when they are taken together synergistic effects will be noted.1,83 Due to the observed interdependency and known interactions of the vitamins, minerals, and amino acids contained in End Fatigue Daily Energy Enfusion, significant support of healthy energy metabolism and healthy energy levels may be realized.

Side Effects

No adverse side effects have been reported. If pregnant, nursing, or taking prescription drugs, consult your healthcare practitioner prior to use.

Storage

Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct light. Keep out of reach of children.

REFERENCE

  1. Teitelbaum J, et al. Effective treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFIDS) and fibromyalgia (FMS) - arandomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, intent to treat study. J. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome 2001; 8:3-28.
  2. Hultman E, Harris RC, Spriet LL. Energy substrates available for work. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999: 762-764.
  3. Grodner M, Anderson SL, DeYoung S. Metabolism. In: Foundations and Clinical Applications of Nutrition: A Nursing Approach. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby; 2000: 76-77.
  4. Guyton AC, Hall JE. Extractions of energy from nutrients. Function of the mitochondria. In: Textbook of Medical Physiology. 10th Ed. Philadelphia, Pa: W.B. Saunders Company; 2000:19-21.
  5. Jiricka MK. Activity intolerance and fatigue. In: Porth CM. Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott; 1998:1269-1272.
  6. Grodner M, Anderson SL, DeYoung S. Vitamin categories. In: Foundations and Clinical Applications of Nutrition: A Nursing Approach. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby; 2000:173-174.
  7. Bates CJ. Vitamin A. Lancet 1995;345:31-35.
  8. Ross AC. Vitamin A and retinoids. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:305-328.
  9. Nieman DC, Henson DA, McAnulty SR, et al. Influence of vitamin C supplementation on oxidative and immune changes after an ultramarathon. J Appl Physiol 2002;92:1970-7.
  10. Jacob RA. Vitamin C. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:467-483.
  11. Brown AJ. Therapeutic uses of vitamin D analogues. Am J Kidney Dis 2001;3:S3-S19.
  12. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Vitamin D. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 669-681.
  13. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Vitamin E. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 682-703.
  14. Booth SL, Broe KE, Peterson JW, et al. Associations between vitamin K biochemical measures and bone mineral density in men and women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:4904-9.
  15. Bugel S. Vitamin K and bone health in adult humans. Vitam Horm 2008;78:393-416.
  16. Craciun AM, Wolf J, Knapen MH, Brouns F, Vermeer C. Improved bone metabolism in female elite athletes after vitamin K supplementation. Int J Sports Med 1998;19:479-84.
  17. Grodner M, Anderson SL, DeYoung S. Thiamin (B1). In: Foundations and Clinical Applications of Nutrition: A Nursing Approach. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby; 2000:175-177.
  18. Tanpaichitr V. Thiamin. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:381-389.
  19. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Thiamin (Vitamin B1). In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 609-615.
  20. McCormick DB. Riboflavin. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:391-399.
  21. Heap LC, Peters TJ, Wessely S. Vitamin B status in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. J R Soc Med 1999;92:183-5.
  22. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Niacin. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 441-449.
  23. Hartman TJ, Woodson K, Stolzenberg-Solomon R, et al. Association of the B-vitamins pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (B(6)), B(12), and folate with lung cancer risk in older men. Am J Epidemiol 2001;153:688-94.
  24. Leklem JE. Vitamin B6. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:412-421.
  25. Herbert V. Folic acid. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:433-446.
  26. Fairfield KM, Fletcher RH. Vitamins for chronic disease prevention in adults: scientific review. JAMA 2002;287:3116-26.
  27. Weir DG, Scott JM. Vitamin B12 Cobalamin. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999: 457-458.
  28. Mock DM. Biotin. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:459-466.
  29. Hendler SS, Rorvik,, eds. D. Biotin. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 84-89.
  30. Said HM. Biotin: the forgotten vitamin. Am J Clin Nutr 2002;75:179-80.
  31. Tahiliani AG, Beinlich CJ. Pantothenic acid in health and disease. Vitam Horm 1991;46:165-228.
  32. Plesofsky-Vig N, Brambl R. Pantothenic acid and coenzyme A in cellular modification of proteins. Annu Rev Nutr 1988;8:461-82.
  33. Plesofsky-Vig N. Pantothenic acid. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999: 423-432.
  34. Hetzel BS, Clugston GA. Iodine. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:253-264.
  35. Shils ME. Magnesium In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:169-192.
  36. Lourenco R, Camilo ME. Magnesium: physiological and clinical relevance. 1: homeostasis and alterations in the metabolism of magnesium. Acta Med Port 2000;13:211-20.
  37. Martini LA. Magnesium supplementation and bone turnover. Nutr Rev 1999;57:227-9.
  38. Reinhart RA. Magnesium metabolism. Wis Med J 1990;89:579-83.
  39. Lastra MD, Pastelin R, Camacho A, Monroy B, Aguilar AE. Zinc intervention on macrophages and lymphocytes response. J Trace Elem Med Biol 2001;15:5-10.
  40. Micheletti A, Rossi R, Rufini S. Zinc status in athletes: relation to diet and exercise. Sports Med 2001;31:577-82.
  41. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Zinc. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 730-737.
  42. Combs GF Jr. Impact of selenium and cancer-prevention findings on the nutrition-health paradigm. Nutr Cancer 2001;40:6-11.
  43. Brown KM, Arthur JR. Selenium, selenoproteins and human health: a review. Public Health Nutr 2001;4:593-9.
  44. Patel JC. Human health and selenium. Indian J Med Sci 2000;54:563-4.
  45. Burk RF, Levander OA. Selenium. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:262-276.
  46. Turnland JR. Copper. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999:241-252.
  47. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Copper. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 161-164.
  48. Neilsen FH. Manganese. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999: 289-292.
  49. Keen CL, Ensunsa JL, Watson MH, et al. Nutritional aspects of manganese from experimental studies. Neurotoxicol 1999;20:213-223.
  50. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Chromium. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 143-147.
  51. Vincent J. The biochemistry of chromium. J Nutr 2000;130:715-718.
  52. Neilsen FH . Molybdenum. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins;1999: 292-293.
  53. Mendel RR. The role of the molybdenum cofactor in humans. BioFactors 2000;11:147-148.
  54. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Potassium. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 509-512.
  55. Young DB, Lin H, McCabe RD. Potassium's cardiovascular protective metabolism. Am J Physiol 1995;268:825-837.
  56. Young DB, Ma G. Vascular protective effects of potassium. Semin Nephrol 1999;19:477-486.
  57. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Whey proteins. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 714-716.
  58. Wong CW, Watson DL. Immunomodulatory effects of dietary whey proteins in mice. J Dairy Res 1995:62:359-368.
  59. Krissansen GW. Emerging health properties of whey proteins and their clinical implications. J Am Coll Nutr 2007;26:713S-23S.
  60. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Malic acid. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 412-413.
  61. Russell IJ, Michalek JE, Flechas JD, Abraham GE. Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome with Super Malic: a randomized, placebo controlled pilot study. J Rheumatol 1995;22:953-958.
  62. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Betaine and Betaine Hydrochloride. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 80-83.
  63. Barak AJ, Beckenhauser HC, Tuma DJ. Betaine, ethanol, and the liver: a review. Alcohol 1996;13:395-8.
  64. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Myo-inositol. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 433-435.
  65. Holub BJ. The nutritional significance, metabolism, and function of myo-inositol and phosphatidylinositol in health and disease. Adv Nutr Res 1982;4:107-41.
  66. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Inulins. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 316-318.
  67. Roberfroid MB. Introducing inulin-type fructans. Br J Nutr 2005;93 Suppl 1:S13-25.
  68. Matthews DE. Proteins and amino acids. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins;1999:11-48.
  69. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Acetylcysteine. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 16-19.
  70. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Quercetin. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 530-533.
  71. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Alpha-Lipoic Acid. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 25-29
  72. Hendler SS, Rorvik, D., eds. Choline. In: PDRA for Nutritional Supplements. 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Physician's Desk Reference Inc; 2008: 136-139.
  73. Zeisel SH. Choline and phosphatidylcholine. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1999: 513-523.
  74. Lee CN, Wong KL, Liu JC, Chen YJ, Cheng JT, Chan P. Inhibitory effect of stevioside on calcium influx to produce antihypertension. Planta Med 2001;67:796-9.
  75. Hsu YH, Liu JC, Kao PF, Lee CN, Chen YJ, Hsieh MH, Chan P. Antihypertensive effect of stevioside in different strains of hypertensive rats. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi (Taipei) 2002;65:1-6.
  76. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C., eds. Stevia. In: PDRA for Herbal Medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ: Thomson Healthcare Inc.; 2007: 789-792.
  77. Chatsudthipong V, Muanprasat C. Stevioside and related compounds: therapeutic benefits beyond sweetness. Pharmacol Ther 2009;121:41-54.
  78. Curi R, Alvarez M, Bazotte RB, Botion LM, Godoy JL, Bracht A. Effect of stevia rebaudiana on glucose tolerance in normal adult humans. Braz J Med Biol Res 1986;19:771-4.
  79. Nielsen FH. Boron. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shine M, Ross AC, Eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 9th ed. Baltimore, Md: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins;1999: 286-288
  80. Boivin G, Meunier PJ. The mineralization of bone tissue: a forgotten dimension in osteoporosis research. Osteoporos Int 2003;14 Suppl 3:S19-24.
  81. Biskobing DM. Novel therapies for osteoporosis. Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2003;12:611-21.
  82. Woodlaw G, Hampl J., eds. Proteins. In: Perspectives in Nutrition. 7th ed. St. Louis, Mo: McGraw-Hill; 2007:235-270.
  83. Teitelbaum J, Bird B. Effective treatment of severe chronic fatigue states: A report of a series of 64 patients. J Musculoskeletal Pain 1995;3:91-110.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Free shipping
with order of $79 or more; only $5.95 for orders below $59

Free consultation
Please contact our licensed specialist at 713-661-8822.

Blood sugar support
Bone and joint health
Cardiovascular health
Cancer patients
Eye health
Female health
Hormonal support
Immune support
Liver health
Male health
Neurological health
Skin and hair health
Stress control / sleep
Multiple vitamins

We carry all products from Douglas Laboratories. Just let us know the name or formula number of the product, we will get it for you at the best price.